Shrīmālā Ltd.

Kemp House, 160 City Road

London, UK EC1V 2NX

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UK: +44 (0)7577 425489

erikjampa@shrimala.com

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© 2020 Shrīmālā Healing Arts. Tibetan Medicine is a millennia-old healing discipline formally acknowledged in Tibet, China, India, Bhutan, and Nepal. However, it is not a licensed medical discipline in the USA, UK, or EU, and therefore is not regulated by the FDA, AMA or any other regulatory body in these countries. Erik is not legally qualified to diagnose any conditions, and no herbal formulas recommended or supplied are intended to prevent, treat, or cure any disease. Therapies or treatments pursued under a Tibetan Medicine Practitioner should not be treated as a replacement for qualified care by a licensed physician.

Two Flowers & Three Fruits

The Goals and Results of Sowa Rigpa

As a healing system, Sowa Rigpa has two principal goals which are always considered when undertaking treatment or education within the Tibetan Medical system. These are good health and longevity. By adopting various preventative and therapeutic measures, and by living a life in balance, we can live long and healthy lives full of enjoyment of the three fruits. 
 

The three fruits comprise the resultant bounty of our efforts in Sowa Rigpa. These are the sweet experiences of Dharma, abundance, and happiness. 

With this view, we can say that the reason for studying or receiving treatment from Sowa Rigpa is to live a long and healthy life full of meaning, abundance, and fundamental happiness.

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Longevity

Good Health

Dharma

Abundance

Happiness

Dharma refers broadly to the teachings of the Buddha, but the technical term dharma, or chö in Tibetan, refers in fact to all "compounded phenomena," meaning any object that can be perceived with the six senses. In this way, the fruit of Dharma refers not only to Buddhist teachings, but to the very concept of phenomenal existence. To reap the fruit of Dharma from a long and healthy life is to experience reality as-it-is, and to live without any cognitive dissonance.

Abundance, or nor (wealth) in Tibetan, refers not to physically accumulated wealth but rather to the experience of innate abundance. This fruit arises when we achieve a sense of contentment with that which we have, and when we are no longer plagued by incessant craving for more. True wealth comes from within, and the experience of wealth relies strongly upon a healthy and balanced lifestyle. 

Happiness is the experience of depth contentment that arises through love, communion, generosity, selfless service, and introspection. We cannot become happy by relying on external circumstances. Rather, when we cultivate the flowers of a healthy and balanced life, happiness is able to naturally dawn in our minds."